Distantly Yours: Web Design and Photos in Bloomington, IN, by Dan Hiester


Archive of software

Why this Android fan just bought an iPhone

Now I’ve really done it. My friends and family will have a difficult time understanding why I’ve made this decision, but I’ve put a lot of thought into it. I’ve bought an iPhone.

The great user interface design cage match of 2011

Once upon a time, Ubuntu was the go-to Linux distribution users curious about the GNOME desktop. In 2011, however, Ubuntu is controversially parting ways with GNOME, as both groups work to completely imagine your computer’s desktop. In two words: It’s on. Who’s going to win? Users like us.

The soft launch of Geeks in the Garden

Last year, my wife and I built a garden. We wanted to build a website to go with it, but that didn’t happen. Not this year, though. As soon as I realized that no one had bought geeksinthegarden.com yet, I knew had to jump right in.

Despite flaws, IEtester does, in fact, test websites in many versions of IE all at once

As much as IEtester has already proven indispensable, it is not 100% win just yet. However, if you have a Windows box or virtual machine with IE7 or higher, and you want your websites to support Windows IE versions 6, 7 and 8, I recommend you try it out.

Test your websites in all versions of IE with the same program

It sounds too good to be true. I’ll have to try this when I get home and write an update with the results. IETester claims to be a program that can render your web pages using any version of Windows IE, from 5.5 through 8 beta 1. It is just an alpha, however, with known issues (including Flash not working in IE6).

Google Chrome stirs talk and tech on the web

I have mixed feelings about Google’s new web browser. Under the hood, it sounds brilliant. The UI itself lacks innovation, but does seem to collect the best ideas from every other browser and integrate them well.

Musings on a lossy text compressor

Forget algorithms, psychoacoustic models and bit rates. When you look beyond the technical implications of lossy compressors, all they do is remove data from images and sound we won’t likely miss. If only we had compressors that did the same thing for text.

Where's the open-source Flash killer?

If you’ve seen last year’s tech demos of the next version of Flash, then you probably know that Flash is well on its way to becoming what Director was five years ago: an expensive software package bloated with features the majority of its users will never need. If Flash killed Director by being a cheap alternative, then when will we see a cheap alternative to Flash? And will it be proprietary software or not?

Bookmarks are on the way out

New features in Firefox 3 make bookmarks a complete waste of time.

IE8 Both a Step Forward, Backward

Microsoft’s new browser has better support for web standards, but also new proprietary features.